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Jo Fitzsimons is a freelance travel writer who has visited over 50 countries. www.indianajo.com is the place where she shares destination details, travel itineraries, planning and booking tips and trip tales. Her aim: to help you plan your travel adventure on your terms and to your budget.

17 Responses

  1. What to Eat in Japan - 20 Alternatives to Sushi | Indiana Jo

    […] If you’re after a life-changing beef moment, get to Kobe, near Kyoto and put some of this spectacularly marbled beef in your mouth. Yes, these are the famous cows that are reputed to have a lavish beer-sipping, massage riddled life. You can read more about eating Kobe beef in my related post here. […]

  2. Goatripsindia
    Goatripsindia at | | Reply

    I wanted to know where can I enjoy nice authentic Kobe beef for lunch in India.

  3. One Day in Pisa: What to See and Do
    One Day in Pisa: What to See and Do at |

    […] taste any the less divine for it. If you know anything about me, you’ll know that beef is a big part of my world and this mammoth piece got top marks. If you’re the kind of person who demands five-star […]

  4. 10 Essential Things To Know About Cuba Before You Visit | Indiana Jo

    […] doubt, one of my favourite travel pastimes and while some countries can deliver me to food Heaven (Japan, Mexico, India), other’s have left me with a fit of food depression including the Philippines […]

  5. How to Make Sausages from Scratch | Indiana Jo

    […] A Life Changing Experience Eating Kobe Beef in Japan […]

  6. Dominik MJ
    Dominik MJ at | | Reply

    Wow – this article is really amazing! I love beef – now I just have to rob a bank to get to Japan and try the real deal!
    There is one important information missing – as for beef from the US, also wagyu beef in Japan has a grade system. And the marbling really depends on which grade you are “talking” to.
    Sometimes I can see here Australian wagyu – and even more rarely it looks really not only marbled but almost pink due to the amount of fat. Off course it is also prohibitively expensive [maybe not as expensive as real Kobe beef – but definitely enough for me] – should I invest into an amazing piece of beef or do the grocery shopping for a week?
    Anyway- there is still sous vide steaks. Different but also melt in your mouth!

  7. yan
    yan at | | Reply

    You sold me, I will have to make a stop in Kobe (on my way from Kyoto -KIX airport) and try authentic Kobe beef. Thanks for eye feast!

  8. J Ng
    J Ng at | | Reply

    Im going to Osaka in April, hopefully can see some Sakura.
    Will try your recommendation (Drooling).
    BTW, how does the JR Pass work?

  9. Joshua
    Joshua at | | Reply

    Kobe is more west than south of Kyoto. Please try Hokkaido Beef if you ever get the chance.

    Or head to Matsuzake, south of Kyoto; or to Omi east of Kyoto for other types of Wagyu. It depends on preference but most say that these are superior to Kobe due to the way the fat and meat is mixed.

    1. IndianaJo
      IndianaJo at | | Reply

      Superior to Kobe – I have to return to Japan!! 🙂 I tried the Hida beef in Takayama, which was also excellent, but hard to compared because I cooked it myself. I think I could definitely plan a trip based entirely on beef eating so thank you very much for the recommendations, Joshua. They are going into my travel book as I type! (Also thanks for the geographical clarification – despite travelling a lot, my map is off kilter more than it should be!)

  10. Daniel
    Daniel at | | Reply

    I just left Wakkoqu thanks to your magnificent article. I ended up going to Kobe as a dinner pit stop. It was really an amazing experience! So much so that I missed my train 🙂

    1. IndianaJo
      IndianaJo at | | Reply

      Hi Daniel, the kobe beef is something else and probably one of the few meals worth missing a train for 🙂 Glad you found my article helpful – my mission in life is to spread the word about good place to travel and to eat so I’m very happy to have helped!

  11. thobs
    thobs at | | Reply

    Hi, I think you’re referring to bean sprouts and not bamboo sprout 😉

    1. IndianaJo
      IndianaJo at | | Reply

      Good spot, thanks! Being British, I’m more used to Brussels sprouts covered in gravy for Christmas lunch – those I never get confused 🙂

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